Album Spotlight: Telefone

With the hip-hop landscape on a changing plateau of male dominance, and the talent pool of female MC’s is either growing or growing endangered (depending on where you look). Yet with her poetic sounds and relatability Noname has dialed in her spot as an up and coming rapper, will you answer the call?  ba99f8be65245a0069e98ca94acf3000

With her debut album Telefone, the 25 year-old Chicago native rapper has worked with the likes of artist such as Chance the rapper, Mick Jenkins, Ravyn Lenae and a song featured on the Netflix series Dear White People.  Showcasing her wordplay skills and witty delivery on topics of social economics, black america and politics, Noname has been climbing up the ranks of rap popularity. Telefone paints a sunny dispositions of vulnerability mixed with melodic bombastic sounds, and her life of growing up in Chicago Illinois.

Boasting ten tracks, Noname takes you on a journey of many different sounds and self reflections of her life in the “Windy City”. From the upbeat inspirational kickoff track of “Yesterday” to the reason she dropped “gypsy” from her rapper name in the ending track “Shadow Man,” she tackles many relatable topics in the 33 minute run time with nothing feeling out of place or rushed. Though praiseworthy Telefone it does have a drastic change in tone half way into the album, (too me it doesn’t throw off the overall theme) but it may sounds like two different albums in one. Personally I feel it artistically adds to the contrast of area she grew up in.

Overall this is a solid album that sports a lot of real life scenarios in a way that doesn’t come off as preachy or head bashing, and though the tone change can make it seem like it breaks the theme… it’s not a big issue. This album I do recommend for the music listener that likes a more jazz or boom bap sound that delivers good vibes.

9 out of/10

Notable Tracks:

  • Reality Check
  • Sunny Duet
  • Forever
  • All I Need

Live awesome, and peace to the planet

-Kelby

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Netflix: Dear White People

If you haven’t read my article “Netflix & Binge,” I showcased some shows that were worthy of binge watch title, and I hoped to drop another gem. Like a rare bird that only shows itself once a year, as can only hope to see it…. this is that show. Majestic as f**k.

Dear White People is an original Netflix series, based on the Movie and Book of the same name. Writer/Director Justin Simien brings you an interwoven story that focuses on the racial perspective of 6 student at the prestigious “Whinchester University,” as they battle topics of race, self identity, colorisum, and more.

Someone once told me that Winchester was like jazz. Now I don’t know much about jazz, but from what I can tell, when your solo is up, you better blow.”

-Lionel Higgins

If you’ve never seen the film (seriously go see the film), but fear not because the show uses the film plot too kick things off, all while seemingly expanding on it. It’s “A Different World” for a new generation, and I couldn’t be more happier with it’s 10 episodes run.

From the Black Student Union’s fredom fighter Sam (Logan Browning) and her friends Joelle & Rggie (Ashley Blaine & Marque Richardson), to the power of the legacy kid Troy (Brandon Bell) and his Uncle Tom-esque group, It’s a groundbreaking series that covers these socially volatile issues in a way thats not “beating a dead horse,” as its easy to get swept up in the students of Armstrong Parker Hall.

Boasting a beautiful soundtrack, and brimming with beautifully set camera shots, it’s a controversial comedy that challenges you to think. It won’t hold your hand or spoon feed you, and will gladly rate you as “woke” or nah.

Dear White People deserve to be binged watched, and it’s wickedly easy to slip into the series and see it’s joys. If you have to question if this show is for you, it’s not… it’s for us. Its proud to say the word “nigga,” and give no f***ks too the European standards of beauty or societies pressures on being black.

“Peace to the planet, and live awsome.”

-Kelby